Mean Tweets

Celebrities reading mean tweets about themselves has been turned into a popular comedy spot on US talk show, Jimmy Kimmel Live.

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The appeal of the slot comes from the ubiquity of social media. Famous faces reading the mean things written about them is cathartic. It’s a clever anti-bullying campaign.

The “mean tweets” feature also highlights how words are powerful. The author of the adage,

Sticks and stones may break my bones,

But words will never hurt me.

does not appreciate the power of words to bless or curse. Ancient cultures acknowledge the power of words, rendering sacred words taboo, eliding names into titles and coining euphemisms. Verbal pronouncements do carry weight and matter, like sticks and stones.

What reading mean tweets does is it takes the energy of a curse, and renders turns it into comedy. It essentially sucks the venom from words and spins them into gold.

This is the power of art, of story, song and poetry. The artist, the story teller, the song writer and poet, can take the venom of hatred, the agony of anger and loss and turn it into a thing that brings relief, joy and blessing.

May we have more art please?

How to Write an Novel in 30 days.


… the secret is not to go to sleep until you’ve written your words for the day. You might be sleep-deprived, but you’ll finish your novel.

Now is my book the next great American novel? No. I wrote it in a month. It’s awful.

But for the rest of my life, if I meet John Hodgman at a TED party, I don’t have to say, “I’m a computer scientist.”

No, no, if I want to, I can say, “I’m a novelist.”

 

This inspiring TED talk was given in 2011 by Matt Cutts, an engineer at Google. He convincingly argues that 30 days is just about the right amount of time to add a new habit or subtract a habit.

What are you waiting for? The next 30 days are going to pass whether you like it or not, so why not think about something you have always wanted to try and give it a shot.